Calls to guarantee post-Brexit residency for EU and British nationals #SharedEuropeanFuture

Brexit is showing more twists and turns than the average Shyamalan film.

While the wrangling and posturing continue, concerns remain over the EU nationals working in the UK and the “Brexpats”, the British nationals based in other EU countries. This is understandably causing anxiety and frustration.

But these are early days in the grand scheme of things, and we have the power to shape Brexit – hard, soft or bendy. As such, there are growing calls to ensure that the rights of residents are recognised.

the3million, a movement started in Bristol to preserve the rights of EU and British citizens alike after Brexit, published a new research report in July to promote reform and help allow EU citizens in the UK to continue to live normally post-Brexit.

The report shows how the “permanent residence” application process creates barriers for EU citizens to claim residence rights after Brexit.

Also in July, the British Council – an organisation with considerably more clout – addressed a set of eminently sensible recommendations to UK and EU leaders, Our Shared European Future. Among the recommendations was a call to guarantee post-Brexit residency rights for both British and EU citizens.

Other recommendations included:

  • A post-Brexit agreement for education, culture, science and research to facilitate movement
  • Cultural and educational permits to allow people to move with ease between the UK and EU countries
  • Guarantees that UK institutions and individuals remain eligible to access programmes such as Erasmus+, Horizon 2020, Marie Sklodowska-Curie Actions and Creative Europe
  • The preservation of opportunities to work and study abroad
  • Proactive engagement of youth in Brexit decision-making

The British Council’s recommendations are endorsed by more than 450 institutions across Europe, including the British Museum, Tate and V&A in London; the Creative Industries Federation; the National Gallery Prague; and CERN (it was CERN that led to the creation of Sir Tim Berners Lee’s World Wide Web, with the rest being history as they say).

Individuals in support comprise leading scientists and artists, including that man off the telly: Professor Brian Cox, Sir David Chipperfield, Mark Wallinger, Claudie Haigneré and Professor Iain Stewart.

And you can endorse these too, of course, by signing the British Council petition here.

It’s absolutely vital – and common sense – that EU residents in Britain and British nationals in Europe are heard and accounted for,  fairly and with respect.

Millennials worldwide still find UK attractive after Brexit vote

We might be a glass half-full bunch in the UK (not a lot wrong with that, unless it’s a pint glass), which might explain why many young Brits are less than optimistic over the impact of the UK’s vote to leave the EU, believing that people abroad will be less likely to visit, do business with and make friends with Britain. Overseas, young people’s perceptions of “Brexit Britain” are more upbeat.

These were the findings of recent surveys conducted by IPSOS Mori for the British Council that looked at perceptions of 18-34 year olds in G20 countries towards the UK before and after that referendum.

The surveys showed that the overall “attractiveness” of the UK remained unchanged after the Brexit vote, with 36% of respondents saying that the referendum outcome had made no impact on their perception. The UK as a globally attractive nations sits in 4th place worldwide behind Canada, Australia, Italy and France.

The report also showed, encouragingly:

  • 57% of G20 respondents said that the UK’s vote to quit the EU made no impact on their visiting the UK. A quarter of respondents from countries outside the UK said they were more likely to visit
  • 52% of respondents across the G20 said the vote would make no difference to their decision to do business or trade with the UK
  • Britain was mostly viewed as a global power by young people in China (80%), who also mostly agreed that Brits value diversity and cultural difference (76%)

The report, From the Outside In, is available to download in PDF and is well worth a read if you’re interested in how young people across the world – who lest we forget are tomorrow’s decision-makers – perceive Britain after the Brexit vote. There are signs of encouragement…and equally work to do. I think our continental neighbours even have a phrase for it – plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.

Hong Kong SAR: 20 years later, it’s time for 2.0

Hong Kong Island skyline

Has it been twenty years already? 1997 was a memorable year for people in Britain, for reasons good and bad. Among other events, Hong Kong was finally handed over to China, marking a new era for all concerned – Hong Kong especially.

Much has happened in the two decades since, and of the three territories, it’s China with the glowing school report. The nation is exerting its influence from Africa to Indonesia, while domestically cities such as Shanghai are luring top global talent, eager to have a stab at the world’s biggest market.

In contrast, Hong Kong and the UK have both seen relative decline (let’s be honest), becoming increasingly divided and unsure of themselves. The parallels between the two are obvious.

But life goes on, as they say, and Hong Kong is the ultimate embodiment of life. No matter who calls the shots; the territory remains a supreme machine, where 7 million people combine efficiently and tightly to keep its wheels turning.

This is hustle and bustle on steroids (if you’re looking for balance, you’ve come to the wrong place), with Hong Kong operating with an intensity and impatience that makes London feel like a country club in comparison.

Yet despite the blistering pace, Hong Kong feels remarkably risk-averse. If Silicon Valley’s mantra is “move fast and break things”, Hong Kong’s spirit can be better described as “move fast and keep things unchanged”. From tech to housing and public light shows, the city now trails behind Shanghai, Singapore and even neighbouring Shenzhen.

There is, mercifully, a growing appetite for disruption. Call it what you want: fintech, regtech, wealth tech, biotech, travel tech, the movements are out there, eager to cement Hong Kong’s “hub” status in the region, leveraging on the city’s strengths.

To get “there” – frankly there is no final destination, as this is a process of constant reiteration and reinvention – Hong Kong will need to overcome its biggest adversary. Not Singapore, not China, but itself. It won’t be easy.

As Hong Kong enters its third decade and adulthood since the handover, new opportunities (and challenges) await that will better serve the “intrapreneurs” and change makers among us. We could be witnessing the start of a new era altogether. And if anyone can help put an end to the city’s whopping cost of living, beers are on me…

Belt and Road promises to open up Asia like never before

Bus in Myanmar

Other than the takeover of Reading FC by the Dai siblings, the big announcement coming out of China this month that will change the world as we know it was the 900 billion dollar “One Belt, One Road” project.

Sounding like a line from a syrupy U2 song, One Belt, One Road refers to a Chinese initiative of unprecedented scale that will see more than 60 countries connected through high-speed rail, bridges, harbours, tunnels, airports and goodness knows what else in the next 5 years…hyperloops and spaceports maybe. Hence “Belt” and “Road” (though confusingly the “Road” is the sea – the so-called Maritime Silk Road). As the professional world loves acronyms, One Belt, One Road is also known as OBOR, not to be mistaken for something cobbled together by the banking sector.

While the name doesn’t translate well into English, OBOR has a clear enough vision and even a template from the past: the ancient Silk Road that connected China with Europe, when bearded traders slugged over mountains with camels and spices, and told fantastic tales.

Marco Polo was a long time ago, of course, and today’s Central Asian countries, the “stans” from Kyrgyzstan to Tajikistan, are relatively unknown to travellers even through they account for a huge chunk of the globe.

Gleaming new highways built with OBOR money might change that, in time helping to make those flyover states between East and West even more appealing destinations. If anything, that midlife London-Kathmandu bike trip should be a less arduous experience.

Railways are shrinking the map further. Earlier this year, the first ever direct train service from China to the UK arrived in Barking after 17 days, passing through 10 countries on a 7,456 mile trip. This was just a freight service., however, and there’s no sign of a commercial service any time soon, which is perhaps just as well: just imagine trying to buy a ticket to China from a train station machine (it’s hard enough finding the right fare from Reading to Oxford).

Commercial bullet train services will, however, string together countries in Southeast Asia. Despite the ubiquity of today’s low-cost airlines, Southeast Asia is not an easy region to navigate.

OBOR will connect Jakarta to Bandung, Indonesia’s third biggest city and creative capital, through a high-speed rail project opening in 2019. More spectacular still, a high-speed line will connect Singapore with Kunming in southern China (Singapore Kunming Rail Link, “SKRL”), through Laos, Thailand and Malaysia.

The 3,000km project will include sections such as Singapore – Kuala Lumpur and Kuala Lumpur – Bangkok. SKRL will, in a sense, “unlock” cities along its route – like the Laotian capital Vientiane – making them more accessible and propelling them into the future. Backpacking through Mekong countries will never be the same again.

Of course, a lot of this might not happen. The world is complicated enough and fraught with uncertainty. But if there is one thing we all need right now, it’s optimism. And OBOR optimism doesn’t get bouncier than this:

Goldsmiths project to look at Brexit impact on Brexpats

White buildings

Are you one of the 1.2 million British citizens living in other EU countries, and feel affected by Brexit, one way or another? Do you feel there are still more questions than answers? Help is on its way, or at least a better understanding of what the heck is happening.

An 18 month project, BrExpats: freedom of movement, citizenship and Brexit in the lives of Britons resident in the EU, aims to shed light on Brexit’s impact on the lives of the British diaspora abroad.

Led by Dr Michaela Benson of Goldsmiths University, the project will look at things like possible restrictions on movement, changes to political rights and social entitlements, and consequences for welfare and healthcare in the UK – for those choosing to come “home”.

Dr Benson explains:

By gaining a clearer understanding of their attitudes, experiences and intentions we hope to engage in a more informed debate about how Brexit can be managed to take into account the potential impacts on lives, institutions and services in the UK and within the EU.

The study will also look at how Brexit is understood by, communicated to (if at all) and influenced by Brexpats – all majorly important areas.