Vancouver is the best city worldwide for startups, reveals PeoplePerHour

Vancouver skyline

With seemingly everyone wanting to disrupt or launch something these days (how different things were in the nineties, when we all had hobbies and adult learning to entertain us), where is best to start The Next Big Thing?

Vancouver, apparently.

The Canadian city ranked first in an index compiled by PeoplePerHour, who assessed locations worldwide on quality of life, cost of living, rent, office space, monthly salary, starting a business and best country for business.

The list shows that smaller cities have triumphed against “goliaths” like Singapore, London, New York, Tokyo and Paris, who all sit in the bottom half of the table (and will probably face relegation unless they become more affordable).

It confirms what many of us suspect: it’s easier to start a business when you’re not saddled with high living costs and rent.

Unsurprisingly, Berlin is best in Europe, Bangkok is top in Asia (though digital nomad hotspot Chiang Mai can’t be far behind), and Melbourne – which generally does well in quality of life surveys – is Australia’s highest showing.

And how about Manchester? A capital of creativity in England, the city came third – much like its football teams – well ahead of the swaggering UK capital:

1. Vancouver
2. Berlin
3. Manchester
4. Lisbon
5. Stockholm
6. San Diego
7. Bangkok
8. Melbourne
9. LA
10. Bangalore
11. Kuala Lumpur
12. Singapore
13. Istanbul
14. London
15. Sydney
16. Tel Aviv
17. Amsterdam
18. Miami
19. Athens
20. Moscow
21. San Francisco
22. NYC
23. Tokyo
24. Paris
25. Rome

Tokyo triumphs again in Monocle Quality of Life Survey

Shibuya, Tokyo

Monocle has announced its Quality of Life Survey for the 11th year running, in which 25 cities worldwide were ranked for liveability. For the third successive year, Tokyo was named most liveable city by the culture mag (here’s something for the conspiracy theorists: Tokyo-based Nikkei Group became a Monocle shareholder three years ago).

The list is a curious mix of hipster favourites such as Berlin and Portland and hyper-expensive sprawls like Hong Kong (ranked second by Mercer’s Cost of Living Survey) and of course Tokyo (ranked third in the same survey), making it a mashup that would likely appeal to both the monied elite and counterculturalists. Which begs the question: should it really be called a Quality of Life Survey?

The rundown in full:

1. Tokyo
2. Vienna
3. Berlin
4. Munich
5. Melbourne
6. Copenhagen
7. Sydney
8. Zurich
9. Hamburg
10. Madrid
11. Stockholm
12. Kyoto
13. Helsinki
14. Fukuoka
15. Hong Kong
16. Lisbon
17. Barcelona
18. Vancouver
19. Dusseldorf
20. Amsterdam
21. Singapore
22. Auckland
23. Brisbane
24. Portland
25. Oslo

Amsterdam is the best city for Millennials to relocate to, reveals Nestpick

Amsterdam

Throughout the year, many surveys are published on the best cities for expats to relocate to. Few are especially relevant to Millennials, who have different expectations from older generations.

Apartment-searching website Nestpick has emerged with perhaps the first study dedicated to Millennial needs specifically: the Millennial City Ranking. The 100-strong index of the cities most relevant to today’s twentysomethings shows that all but one in the top 10 are European destinations.

Top of the pack is liberal Amsterdam, a city with enduring appeal throughout the generations, followed by German hipster hotspot Berlin and Munich:

  1. Amsterdam
  2. Berlin
  3. Munich
  4. Lisbon
  5. Antwerp
  6. Barcelona
  7. Lyon
  8. Cologne
  9. Paris
  10. Vancouver

Explaining the Millennial City Ranking, Nestpick MD Ömer Kücükdere says:

Millennials travel more at a younger age than any of their preceding generations; this gives them the possibility to find the perfect city for their personal needs. With aging populations cities must cater to the Millennial demographic in order to sustain a thriving economy.

(I’d love to know what Boomers make of that last comment.)

Nestpick used the following unique criteria, on top of the usual such as housing and employment scores, to rank and compile their list of dream cities (and I’m not making this up):

  • the affordability of 500ml domestic beer
  • the number of music festivals per capita in and around the city
  • access to contraception
  • the number of Apple stores per capita
  • levels of tourism within a city
  • internet speeds

Thankfully, Nestpick have made it possible on their website to identify top scoring cities in each category.

Accordingly, we see that Beijing is best for both 500ml beer (I personally recommend the wonderful Great Leap Brewery, once you are able to locate it deep inside a hutong neighbourhood) and contraception (so go easy on that cheap beer), Geneva is best for Apple stores, San Francisco is best for startups, and Berlin is best for clubbing.

It might all seem like a bit of fun, but young people in growing numbers do talk of relocation, and major world cities are seeing a rise in the cost of living. There may be an interesting shift in the years to come, as talent moves to traditionally less appealing cities.

Canada, Australia have world’s most liveable cities, says EIU

The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) has unveiled, to no real surprise perhaps, that Melbourne is the most liveable city in the world, for the 5th year running. The news comes days after ECA International’s Cost of Living survey was revealed for 2015 (showing very different results, interestingly enough). The Australian city is joined in their top 5 by Vienna, Vancouver, Toronto, Calgary and Adelaide, with seven of the top 10 accounted for by cities in Australia and Canada:

If you’re young and fancy a move to one of these places, however, you might be put off by high living costs:

The EIU’s Global Liveability Ranking is not the only quality of living index, of course, with the likes of Mercer and Monocle magazine offering very different perspectives (hello Tokyo):

Ultimately, liveability is entirely subjective. If you’re young and into tech, you might be more cheerful in a city like San Francisco. People with families will prefer Singapore over Bangkok, while young professionals might be more motivated living in a Chinese city. London continues to divide opinion.

Where would you rather be?

Shanghai, Beijing among most expensive cities in the world

Juba

Switzerland might the happiest country in the world, but you wouldn’t necessarily want to move there any time soon: four Swiss cities are named among the most expensive cities worldwide for international assignees in ECA International’s Cost of Living survey.

The singularly most pricey city in the world, however, rocketing into first place from 9th spot last year, is Juba in South Sudan. Entering the top 10 for the first time are Shanghai (8) and Beijing (9). Having lived in Shanghai myself, I can attest to the high cost of living there – however, don’t let that put you off: there are great opportunities in China for people with the right mindset!