Amsterdam is the best city for Millennials to relocate to, reveals Nestpick

Amsterdam

Throughout the year, many surveys are published on the best cities for expats to relocate to. Few are especially relevant to Millennials, who have different expectations from older generations.

Apartment-searching website Nestpick has emerged with perhaps the first study dedicated to Millennial needs specifically: the Millennial City Ranking. The 100-strong index of the cities most relevant to today’s twentysomethings shows that all but one in the top 10 are European destinations.

Top of the pack is liberal Amsterdam, a city with enduring appeal throughout the generations, followed by German hipster hotspot Berlin and Munich:

  1. Amsterdam
  2. Berlin
  3. Munich
  4. Lisbon
  5. Antwerp
  6. Barcelona
  7. Lyon
  8. Cologne
  9. Paris
  10. Vancouver

Explaining the Millennial City Ranking, Nestpick MD Ömer Kücükdere says:

Millennials travel more at a younger age than any of their preceding generations; this gives them the possibility to find the perfect city for their personal needs. With aging populations cities must cater to the Millennial demographic in order to sustain a thriving economy.

(I’d love to know what Boomers make of that last comment.)

Nestpick used the following unique criteria, on top of the usual such as housing and employment scores, to rank and compile their list of dream cities (and I’m not making this up):

  • the affordability of 500ml domestic beer
  • the number of music festivals per capita in and around the city
  • access to contraception
  • the number of Apple stores per capita
  • levels of tourism within a city
  • internet speeds

Thankfully, Nestpick have made it possible on their website to identify top scoring cities in each category.

Accordingly, we see that Beijing is best for both 500ml beer (I personally recommend the wonderful Great Leap Brewery, once you are able to locate it deep inside a hutong neighbourhood) and contraception (so go easy on that cheap beer), Geneva is best for Apple stores, San Francisco is best for startups, and Berlin is best for clubbing.

It might all seem like a bit of fun, but young people in growing numbers do talk of relocation, and major world cities are seeing a rise in the cost of living. There may be an interesting shift in the years to come, as talent moves to traditionally less appealing cities.

Goldsmiths project to look at Brexit impact on Brexpats

White buildings

Are you one of the 1.2 million British citizens living in other EU countries, and feel affected by Brexit, one way or another? Do you feel there are still more questions than answers? Help is on its way, or at least a better understanding of what the heck is happening.

An 18 month project, BrExpats: freedom of movement, citizenship and Brexit in the lives of Britons resident in the EU, aims to shed light on Brexit’s impact on the lives of the British diaspora abroad.

Led by Dr Michaela Benson of Goldsmiths University, the project will look at things like possible restrictions on movement, changes to political rights and social entitlements, and consequences for welfare and healthcare in the UK – for those choosing to come “home”.

Dr Benson explains:

By gaining a clearer understanding of their attitudes, experiences and intentions we hope to engage in a more informed debate about how Brexit can be managed to take into account the potential impacts on lives, institutions and services in the UK and within the EU.

The study will also look at how Brexit is understood by, communicated to (if at all) and influenced by Brexpats – all majorly important areas.

More expat assignments leading to failure, reveals ECA

Work stress

More and more expat assignments aren’t working out for either party, a new report reveals.

Global mobility company ECA International’s latest Managing Mobility Survey showed that the number of assignments terminated early in 2016 was 7.2%, up from 4.9% in 2012 – a difference of around 50%. The failure rate was highest in big companies (more than 10,000 staff).

Unsurprisingly, the cause of these early terminations was “a mismatch between expectations and reality”. Nearly three in five employers reported that assignments ended early because of assignees underperforming in their new role. The second most common reason given was the international assignee quitting early over dissatisfaction with their new role.

Partly this is down to not fitting in: assignments are failing because of families not adapting to cultural differences. According to the report, only 18% of employers offer cultural training for the family (which is quite astonishing, as getting it right culturally is critically important, as evident here and here.)

While the report doesn’t appear to explain why the failure rate has gone up, the following solution is offered:

The key to improving an employee’s ability to adapt to assignment and, later, post-assignment life is making sure they are well prepared for what is to come.

It’s common sense: preparation is everything. But rather than consult guides and websites, try before you buy. Get out to the overseas destination in question, interact with your new colleagues in person rather than through email, and get a feel for the culture.

And if everything goes very terribly wrong, at least you’ll have something to talk about down the pub, or at your local Fuckup Night if you’re more entrepreneurially minded.  And let’s face it, you can’t be any worse than this guy, right?: