Young Brits encouraged to acquire China work experience

Great Wall of China

Big advertising boss Sir Martin Sorrell, founder and CEO of WPP, has posted a rousing article on LinkedIn, To Move Upward, Move Outward, about the importance of acquiring overseas work experience, China specifically, explaining that:

In a world becoming smaller every day through globalisation and digital connectivity, we need people who can demonstrate they have what it takes to succeed in this environment. Increasingly, employers are looking for knowledge of markets beyond the West, an international outlook and the willingness to be mobile.

Sir Martin was writing as a “Leading Light”, or influential figure who has benefited from China, championing the British Council’s Generation UK: China Network, which recently celebrated its first birthday. The initiative aims to connect all UK nationals with China experience so that they continue and deepen their engagement with China. Specifically, it supports student employability and skills development, and provides a platform for Brits to further their business, academic and entrepreneurial connections to China.

As part of the campaign, the British Council will be hosting an event this Thursday on opportunities to study, work, teach or complete research in China. If you are flirting with the idea of moving to the Middle Kingdom, head on down to the British Council’s London HQ on 13 October. The two-hour event will start at 11am (full details and registration here). Who knows where a stint in this extraordinary country might take you?

British nationals with China experience already, meanwhile, can apply to join the Generation UK: China Network on LinkedIn, now numbering almost 2,500 members, to connect with other China alumni. Joining the network also provides access to high-profile speaker events, Alumni Awards and career opportunities. Sounds hen hao to me!

Shenhzen shows the way for makers and creatives

Shenzhen

Hong Kong has always been a popular – and iconic – expat destination in Asia. But could next-door neighbour Shenhzen steal its thunder, at least among creative and technology types?

The capital of global hardware manufacturing (home to Huawei, DJI and Tencent, among others), a major design hub and popular with Silicon Valley startups, Shenzhen means serious business.

Writing for Make: magazine last year, Gareth Branwyn commented:

If you’re serious about taking any type of consumer electronics product to market – robots, microcontroller-based projects, mobile phones, laptops, internet appliances, 3D printers, etc. – there is only one city where you need to be, and that’s Shenzen.

To show just how extensive this “maker” revolution is in Shenzhen, Meijing He of British Council Hong Kong has shared a downloadable PDF map of maker spaces, incubators and accelerators (10 MB). And for those of you based in the UK and wanting to get involved in the maker scene in China, here is an infographic:

Makers in China and UK-infographic

Shanghai, Beijing among most expensive cities in the world

Juba

Switzerland might the happiest country in the world, but you wouldn’t necessarily want to move there any time soon: four Swiss cities are named among the most expensive cities worldwide for international assignees in ECA International’s Cost of Living survey.

The singularly most pricey city in the world, however, rocketing into first place from 9th spot last year, is Juba in South Sudan. Entering the top 10 for the first time are Shanghai (8) and Beijing (9). Having lived in Shanghai myself, I can attest to the high cost of living there – however, don’t let that put you off: there are great opportunities in China for people with the right mindset!