Choson Exchange seeks speakers for North Korea startup festival

A street in Pyongsong, in North Korea

Fed up of Brexit Britain? Ruling out Hong Kong with its protests? Singapore too middle of the road? How about somewhere a little unconventional for your next gig – like North Korea?

A Startup Festival is coming to Pyongsong in North Korea (yes, I’m a little surprised too) in November 16-23, and social enterprise Choson Exchange is looking for applicants to take part in speaking and mentoring roles. I consider myself to be geographically quite astute, especially having lived in Asia for a number of years, but I’d not heard of Pyongsong.

A quick Google search reveals that Pyongsong is an hour north of Pyongyang, with a population of 284,000, making it the size of Derby (and probably just as exciting).

Improbably described as the Silicon Valley of North Korea, or more technically a tech-focused special economic zone, Pyongsong doesn’t appear to have many attractions.

There is the Atomic Energy Research Institute which, at a guess, you probably won’t get to visit unless you’re Dennis Rodman. Pyongsong also offers ‘attractions’ that include a town square, a school and a plastic leather factory.

Choson Exchange has been with entrepreneurs in North Korea for a while, as mentioned previously on this blog (Could you be the Choson one?), so it seems you’re in safe hands.

How to apply

If you have a background in entrepreneurship, marketing, economics or consulting, and wish to contribute to peaceful economic development in North Korea, sign up on the Choson Exchange website (but hurry: the application deadline is 25 August).

As can be expected,  citizens of the US, Japan and South Korea cannot be considered due to restrictions.  If you’re a British citizen, you should probably also read the FCO’s travel advice:

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all but essential travel to North Korea (DPRK).

Few British people visit North Korea. Those that do are usually part of an organised tour. If you decide to visit North Korea, follow the advice of your tour group and the local authorities. Failure to do so could put your personal safety at risk.

Offences that would be considered trivial in other countries can incur very severe penalties in North Korea, particularly actions the authorities deem to be disrespectful towards the North Korean leadership or government.