Tokyo triumphs again in Monocle Quality of Life Survey

Shibuya, Tokyo

Monocle has announced its Quality of Life Survey for the 11th year running, in which 25 cities worldwide were ranked for liveability. For the third successive year, Tokyo was named most liveable city by the culture mag (here’s something for the conspiracy theorists: Tokyo-based Nikkei Group became a Monocle shareholder three years ago).

The list is a curious mix of hipster favourites such as Berlin and Portland and hyper-expensive sprawls like Hong Kong (ranked second by Mercer’s Cost of Living Survey) and of course Tokyo (ranked third in the same survey), making it a mashup that would likely appeal to both the monied elite and counterculturalists. Which begs the question: should it really be called a Quality of Life Survey?

The rundown in full:

1. Tokyo
2. Vienna
3. Berlin
4. Munich
5. Melbourne
6. Copenhagen
7. Sydney
8. Zurich
9. Hamburg
10. Madrid
11. Stockholm
12. Kyoto
13. Helsinki
14. Fukuoka
15. Hong Kong
16. Lisbon
17. Barcelona
18. Vancouver
19. Dusseldorf
20. Amsterdam
21. Singapore
22. Auckland
23. Brisbane
24. Portland
25. Oslo

Amsterdam is the best city for Millennials to relocate to, reveals Nestpick

Amsterdam

Throughout the year, many surveys are published on the best cities for expats to relocate to. Few are especially relevant to Millennials, who have different expectations from older generations.

Apartment-searching website Nestpick has emerged with perhaps the first study dedicated to Millennial needs specifically: the Millennial City Ranking. The 100-strong index of the cities most relevant to today’s twentysomethings shows that all but one in the top 10 are European destinations.

Top of the pack is liberal Amsterdam, a city with enduring appeal throughout the generations, followed by German hipster hotspot Berlin and Munich:

  1. Amsterdam
  2. Berlin
  3. Munich
  4. Lisbon
  5. Antwerp
  6. Barcelona
  7. Lyon
  8. Cologne
  9. Paris
  10. Vancouver

Explaining the Millennial City Ranking, Nestpick MD Ömer Kücükdere says:

Millennials travel more at a younger age than any of their preceding generations; this gives them the possibility to find the perfect city for their personal needs. With aging populations cities must cater to the Millennial demographic in order to sustain a thriving economy.

(I’d love to know what Boomers make of that last comment.)

Nestpick used the following unique criteria, on top of the usual such as housing and employment scores, to rank and compile their list of dream cities (and I’m not making this up):

  • the affordability of 500ml domestic beer
  • the number of music festivals per capita in and around the city
  • access to contraception
  • the number of Apple stores per capita
  • levels of tourism within a city
  • internet speeds

Thankfully, Nestpick have made it possible on their website to identify top scoring cities in each category.

Accordingly, we see that Beijing is best for both 500ml beer (I personally recommend the wonderful Great Leap Brewery, once you are able to locate it deep inside a hutong neighbourhood) and contraception (so go easy on that cheap beer), Geneva is best for Apple stores, San Francisco is best for startups, and Berlin is best for clubbing.

It might all seem like a bit of fun, but young people in growing numbers do talk of relocation, and major world cities are seeing a rise in the cost of living. There may be an interesting shift in the years to come, as talent moves to traditionally less appealing cities.

London perceived as the world’s best city, PwC report shows

London phone box

City rankings are all the rage these days. This year we have seen surveys from Mercer, the EIU and Monocle. Any day now, I’m expecting to see the World’s Best Cities to Celebrate the Festive Season (with the likes of Vienna emerging top again).

Most recently, PwC have joined the throng, revealing the world’s Best Cities as voted for by the public across a range of factors such as politics, food, happiness, culture and business. The report was conducted in collaboration with BAV Consulting, polling 5,200 decision makers, informed elites and other members of the public from 16 countries (I’m not sure why so few countries were targeted) in December 2015.

Unsurprisingly, it’s the so-called “world cities” that dominate international affairs and fill column inches that have won most recognition. They have a left an imprint on the public consciousness.

London (which enjoys by far most media attention in the UK) is seen as the world’s greatest city, with perennial superbrands Paris and New York completing the top three:

    1. London
    2. Paris
    3. New York
    4. Amsterdam
    5. Sydney
    6. Berlin
    7. Tokyo
    8. Toronto
    9. Stockholm
    10. Los Angeles

It’s hard to see London displaced any time soon. Brexit is unlikely to hurt London’s ranking, a question posed by PwC in their report. The UK capital has a history of battling through crises. More than anything, its capacity to remain resilient and reinvent itself throughput the years underlines its appeal, like all successful brands.

Yet while the traditional triumvirate are seen as the most influential, they might not necessarily be the most liveable cities. Young people are keen to move away from expensive cities, and from London in particular.

PwC’s findings are especially interesting as a report was released in parallel showing how cities were performing in “reality”, based on hard facts instead of perception. The report, Cities of Opportunity, showed that while London came top again, Singapore and Toronto emerged second and third best, respectively:

  1. London
  2. Singapore
  3. Toronto
  4. Paris
  5. Amsterdam
  6. New York
  7. Stockholm
  8. San Francisco
  9. Hong Kong
  10. Sydney

It appears that Hong Kong and Singapore have an image problem!