More Millennials want to work abroad…but London is the most attractive city worldwide

Australian beach with skyscrapers

We might not want to study abroad in great numbers (a pity, as there are wonderful experiences to be had), but all that appears to change once we enter the workforce. Brits are reportedly more willing to work overseas than ever.

Maybe it’s Brexit, or the fancy Instagram pictures posted by travel influencers (faked or otherwise). Perhaps it’s the price of a London pint. Or it’s all three. Whatever the reasons, there has been a significant increase over the past four years in British workers’ willingness to work overseas, according to a new report by Boston Consulting Group and totaljobs.com.

The study called Decoding Global Talent looked at the job preferences and mobility of 366,000 workers across 197 countries worldwide, including their willingness to relocate for work. The percentage of respondents wanting to move abroad in Britain showed the biggest increase of any country worldwide, jumping from 44% in 2014 to 62% in 2018.

This is especially true of Millennials under 30 or Brits with advanced degrees: 73% would leave for a job elsewhere. As for where they would like to move to, it’s the usual suspects: Australia is first, while the US, Canada and Germany are also popular destinations.

In an interesting twist, the same survey shows that the most appealing city worldwide for global workers is none other than London, ahead of New York, Berlin, Barcelona and Amsterdam. The report cites the British capital’s

rich history, abundant old-world charm, an international and diverse population, and, not incidentally, an electorate that voted by a three-to-two margin to stay in the EU.

Right – Brexit (again).

Millennials worldwide still find UK attractive after Brexit vote

We might be a glass half-full bunch in the UK (not a lot wrong with that, unless it’s a pint glass), which might explain why many young Brits are less than optimistic over the impact of the UK’s vote to leave the EU, believing that people abroad will be less likely to visit, do business with and make friends with Britain. Overseas, young people’s perceptions of “Brexit Britain” are more upbeat.

These were the findings of recent surveys conducted by IPSOS Mori for the British Council that looked at perceptions of 18-34 year olds in G20 countries towards the UK before and after that referendum.

The surveys showed that the overall “attractiveness” of the UK remained unchanged after the Brexit vote, with 36% of respondents saying that the referendum outcome had made no impact on their perception. The UK as a globally attractive nations sits in 4th place worldwide behind Canada, Australia, Italy and France.

The report also showed, encouragingly:

  • 57% of G20 respondents said that the UK’s vote to quit the EU made no impact on their visiting the UK. A quarter of respondents from countries outside the UK said they were more likely to visit
  • 52% of respondents across the G20 said the vote would make no difference to their decision to do business or trade with the UK
  • Britain was mostly viewed as a global power by young people in China (80%), who also mostly agreed that Brits value diversity and cultural difference (76%)

The report, From the Outside In, is available to download in PDF and is well worth a read if you’re interested in how young people across the world – who lest we forget are tomorrow’s decision-makers – perceive Britain after the Brexit vote. There are signs of encouragement…and equally work to do. I think our continental neighbours even have a phrase for it – plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.

Amsterdam is the best city for Millennials to relocate to, reveals Nestpick

Amsterdam

Throughout the year, many surveys are published on the best cities for expats to relocate to. Few are especially relevant to Millennials, who have different expectations from older generations.

Apartment-searching website Nestpick has emerged with perhaps the first study dedicated to Millennial needs specifically: the Millennial City Ranking. The 100-strong index of the cities most relevant to today’s twentysomethings shows that all but one in the top 10 are European destinations.

Top of the pack is liberal Amsterdam, a city with enduring appeal throughout the generations, followed by German hipster hotspot Berlin and Munich:

  1. Amsterdam
  2. Berlin
  3. Munich
  4. Lisbon
  5. Antwerp
  6. Barcelona
  7. Lyon
  8. Cologne
  9. Paris
  10. Vancouver

Explaining the Millennial City Ranking, Nestpick MD Ömer Kücükdere says:

Millennials travel more at a younger age than any of their preceding generations; this gives them the possibility to find the perfect city for their personal needs. With aging populations cities must cater to the Millennial demographic in order to sustain a thriving economy.

(I’d love to know what Boomers make of that last comment.)

Nestpick used the following unique criteria, on top of the usual such as housing and employment scores, to rank and compile their list of dream cities (and I’m not making this up):

  • the affordability of 500ml domestic beer
  • the number of music festivals per capita in and around the city
  • access to contraception
  • the number of Apple stores per capita
  • levels of tourism within a city
  • internet speeds

Thankfully, Nestpick have made it possible on their website to identify top scoring cities in each category.

Accordingly, we see that Beijing is best for both 500ml beer (I personally recommend the wonderful Great Leap Brewery, once you are able to locate it deep inside a hutong neighbourhood) and contraception (so go easy on that cheap beer), Geneva is best for Apple stores, San Francisco is best for startups, and Berlin is best for clubbing.

It might all seem like a bit of fun, but young people in growing numbers do talk of relocation, and major world cities are seeing a rise in the cost of living. There may be an interesting shift in the years to come, as talent moves to traditionally less appealing cities.